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Made

Found

Made

Found

Made

Here are things I've created myself.
Play Reversi!
2016-05-02: Site News

Play Reversi!

I added a Reversi (a.k.a. Othello) game to my site. The AI will improve in a few weeks, once the genetic algorithm I've written has had time to optimize the parameters.

2016-02-24: Site News

Site update

There's a new page about my favorite illustrators, a page about my Java games (although it's difficult to get Java applets to run in browsers nowadays), I've added a cake recipe (in Swedish), and there's a new image in the portfolio.

I've made some corrections to the site code; some minor functions are still missing, but as of this update, the site seems to be working more or less as it should, and I'll start concentrating on adding more content.

Also: It turns out I had forgotten to include the file responsible for saving portfolio image ratings. Go rate my portfolio images!

Elvis
2016-02-22: Portfolio

Elvis

A caricature for Caricaturama Showdown 3000

I bought some comics!
2015-04-24: Journal

I bought some comics!

I received a package today! For the first time in a long while, I've ordered comics from Yesasia and Amazon, including Åsa Ekström's new book about culture clashes and misadventures in Japan. Now all I need to do is to learn these stupid languages.

2014-12-23: Site News

Site redesign

I decided to switch to a new layout before everything was ready, partly to force myself to finally get it done, and partly to stress myself out for no good reason. Come back in a week or so, and I'll have much more content up. You should probably be celebrating Christmas now anyway.

Example layout
2014-04-26: Portfolio

Example layout

An unused layout for a project

Example layout 2
2014-04-26: Portfolio

Example layout 2

An unused layout for a project

Judi Dench
2014-03-18: Portfolio

Judi Dench

A caricature for Caricaturama Showdown 3000

Crow girl
2013-11-01: Portfolio

Crow girl

Pig robot
2013-05-23: Portfolio

Pig robot

My friend Anna likes pigs and robots.

Nothing Personal
2012-12-01: Portfolio

Nothing Personal

Cards for the board game Nothing Personal

Big Mary
2012-11-01: Portfolio

Big Mary

Bette Davis
2012-09-28: Portfolio

Bette Davis

A caricature for Caricaturama Showdown 3000

Chaplin
2012-08-27: Portfolio

Chaplin

Trädfällning & Trädgård
2011-07-21: Portfolio

Trädfällning & Trädgård

A new site design for Trädfällning och Trädgård with a specially adapted CMS; eg you can drag an image to the CMS, and it will automatically upload it, resize it, create thumbnails and add it to a lightbox gallery.

ELA
2010-07-09: Portfolio

ELA

Smakverket
2009-12-18: Portfolio

Smakverket

Christmas card 2008
2008-12-12: Portfolio

Christmas card 2008

A morbid Christmas card I made for my friend Alice

Forgotten Lands: First Colony
2008-06-21: Portfolio

Forgotten Lands: First Colony

Some graphics for the game Forgotten Lands: First Colony

The Aviator
2008-06-13: Portfolio

The Aviator

Found

Fun or interesting things from the internet.
2016-09-11: Link blog

Frown

Some English-speakers use "frown" to mean "a wrinkling of the brow in displeasure or concentration", while others use it to mean "turning down the corners of your mouth". These two groups are largely unaware that the other group exists.

Seriously, this has blown my mind. 39, American, frown has always meant a mouth thing to me. I had no idea a different definition or usage even existed.

2016-09-01: Link blog

Places with more men than women do not typically experience higher rates of social instability

According to a University of Utah study, surpluses of men are associated with higher levels of marriage, relationship commitment and paternal involvement, a contrast to prevailing theories that an abundance of single men lead to outcomes of crime, violence and broken homes. 

"You get more unmarried men when there are fewer [men]. Men may be less interested in settling down with a single partner when there are multiple options available."

2016-08-30: Link blog

Reviews based on predictive text

Reviews, manuals, scripts and warnings from a program that tries to imitate existing text without understanding it. Quotes from its review of the Paris catacombs:

i have visited the graves of the tour groups who died from being embarrassed to be underground.

don't get sunburned in the catacombs where the bones are creepy and the ceilings are allowed to touch you.

i got an audio headset for €5 but it said only a fraction of what i thought it would say. it said that the city of lights was worth a visit. it said that i was lucky to be cool. not sure why it said "kids arrive in winter."

it took 12 hours to read the history of bones. i heard that bones are real and are actually a good health hazard that you need in your face.

2016-08-14: Music diary

Carpenter Brut - What We Fight For

2016-07-31: Link blog

The best games of 2016 so far: A Gameological catch-up guide

2016-07-28: Link blog

One hour of physical activity per day could offset health risk of 8 hours of sitting

Contrary to earlier studies, a new meta-analysis says that the increased risk of death associated with sitting for 8 hours a day could be eliminated for people who did a minimum of 1 hour physical activity per day. Examples of physical activity were brisk walking at 5.6 km/h or cycling for pleasure at 16 km/h. 

Our message is a positive one: it is possible to reduce - or even eliminate - these risks if we are active enough, even without having to take up sports or go to the gym.

In 1995 Wal-Mart pulled a "Someday A Woman Will Be President" t-shirt because it was seen as offensive
2016-07-27: Link blog

In 1995 Wal-Mart pulled a "Someday A Woman Will Be President" t-shirt because it was seen as offensive

“It was determined the T-shirt was offensive to some people and so the decision was made to pull it from the sales floor,” Jane Bockholt said. Ann Moliver Ruben, the 70-year-old psychologist who designed the shirt and sold them to the store, said the retailer’s response means “that promoting females as leaders is still a very threatening concept in this country." A buyer at the company reportedly said that the shirt "goes against Wal-Mart's family values."

2016-07-20: Link blog

A final response to "Tell me why Trump is a fascist"

Trump openly calls for the U.S. to commit war crimes and advocates for the murder of innocent women and children. After veterans speak out claiming U.S. soldiers would not commit war crimes or torture children, Trump insists that they will if he orders them. He calls for the U.S. to start torturing prisoners in any way ISIS does. He says he would declare a world war, and he doesn't rule out using nuclear weapons in Europe. He promises to forcibly seize foreign oil fields in foreign countries. He encourages his supporters to use violence, and defends supporters who assault others. Etc. Etc.

2016-07-04: Link blog

Re-reading Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow is an excellent book – but one with many flaws. First, there is the list of studies that simply haven’t held up through the “replication crisis” of the last few years (for example, the first substantive chapter is on priming). Also, Kahneman describes hot hands as a "widespread cognitive illusion", whereas newer studies have found that there is a hot hand. And on organ donation rates, Kahneman describes the difference between European countries as being due to differences in form design, when in fact those European countries with high “donor rates” never ask their citizens whether they wish to be donors.

2016-07-03: Link blog

Milk and Other Surprising Ways to Stay Hydrated

Oral rehydration solution, milk, and (to a lesser degree) orange juice had a significantly higher hydration index than water. Normally when you drink, it signals the kidneys to get rid of the extra water by producing more urine, but when beverages contain nutrients and electrolytes, the stomach empties more slowly with a less dramatic effect on the kidneys.

Furthermore, drinks containing moderate amounts of caffeine and alcohol or high levels of sugar had hydration indexes no different from water. The exceptions are very strong coffee drinks or strong alcoholic drinks like distilled spirits.

2016-07-03: Link blog

How Children Went from Worthless to Priceless

In 1896, the parents of a two-year-old killed due to the negligence of the Southern Railroad Company of Georgia asked a judge for compensation. They argued that their child performed errands worth two dollars per month, but they received nothing beyond the cost of a burial. The judge concluded that the child was "of such tender years as to be unable to have any earning capacity, and hence the defendant could not be held liable in damages."

In 18th century Europe, the death of an infant or a young child was a minor event, met with a mixture of indifference and resignation. Viviana Zelizer, in her book Pricing the Priceless Child, argues that children became “sacralized” in the late 1800s and early 1900s — transforming children from un-sentimentalized but economically useful little people to economically useless yet emotionally priceless treasures.

Colonial Americans buried infants without fuss, but in the 20th century, parents read books that advised them on how to cope with the unbearable loss of a child.

2016-06-22: Link blog

Lenin was a mushroom

Lenin was a mushroom was a highly influential televised hoax, first broadcast on 17 May 1991 on Leningrad Television. Sergey Kuryokhin, impersonating a historian, narrated his findings that Vladimir Lenin consumed large quantities of psychedelic mushrooms and eventually became a mushroom himself.

Soviet television had, up to that point, been regarded as conservative in style and content. As a result, a large number of Soviet citizens (one estimate puts the number at 11,250,000 audience members) took the deadpan "interview" at face value.

Perhaps the most notable result of the show was an appeal by a group of party members to clarify the veracity of Kuryokhin's claim. In response to the request one of the top regional functionaries stated that "Lenin could not have been a mushroom" because "a mammal can not be a plant."

2016-06-16: Link blog

What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team

After studying the composition of hundreds of Google’s teams, there was nothing showing that a mix of specific personality types or skills or backgrounds made any difference. Most confounding of all, two teams might have nearly identical makeups, with overlapping memberships, but radically different levels of effectiveness.

Turning their eye to group norms, they noticed two behaviors that all the good teams generally shared. First, on the good teams, members spoke in roughly the same proportion. Second, the good teams all had high "average social sensitivity" – the team members were skilled at intuiting how others felt and could tell if someone was feeling upset or left out. Taken together, this created an environment where people felt safe that they would not be embarrassed or punished for speaking up.
 
Other behaviors were also important — like making sure teams had clear goals and creating a culture of dependability – but psychological safety was critical.
2016-06-10: Link blog

Links sent through Facebook messenger can be read by anyone

Using the Facebook API and a program that guesses id numbers of data stored in Facebook's database, people can read URLs that were sent privately through Messenger, potentially revealing sensitive information. Facebook isn't planning to do anything about it.

2016-06-10: Link blog

80000 hours: Career guide

Includes a guide covering two decades of research into what makes for a dream job.

Siemens has an army of spider robots that work as a team to complete tasks
2016-06-06: Link blog

Siemens has an army of spider robots that work as a team to complete tasks

The robots use onboard cameras as well as a laser scanner to interpret their immediate environment. Knowing the range of its 3D-printer arm, each robot autonomously works out which part of an area—regardless of whether the area is flat or curved—it can cover, while other robots use the same technique to cover adjacent areas.

Additionally the spiders have been programmed to have a level of autonomy. They know where they are, and when their batteries get low they will make their way back to a charging station and hand off whatever task they were working on to another spider in the system, allowing it to pick up where they left off. 

2016-06-04: Link blog

Flat lens promises possible revolution in optics

The lens is quite unlike the curved disks of glass familiar from cameras and binoculars. Instead, it is made of a thin layer of transparent quartz coated in millions of tiny pillars, each just tens of nanometres across and hundreds high.

The focal spot of the flat lens was typically 30% sharper than its competition, meaning that in a lab setting, finer details can be revealed. The lenses, being planar, can be fabricated in the same foundries that make computer chips.

2016-06-03: Link blog

Clozemaster

Clozemaster is gamified language learning in context through mass exposure for learners of all levels. It aims to answer the question, "What should I do after duolingo?" and provide a more sentence based and contextual learning experience to complement other language learning apps like Memrise and Anki.

Deepart.io – Repaint your picture in the style of your favorite artist
2016-06-03: Link blog

Deepart.io – Repaint your picture in the style of your favorite artist

"We use an algorithm inspired by the human brain. It uses the stylistic elements of one image to draw the content of another. Get your own artwork in just three steps."

Here's a blog with examples.

2016-06-03: Link blog

Remember that study saying America is an oligarchy? 3 rebuttals say it's wrong.

Out of the 1,779 bills in the Gilens/Page data set, majorities of the rich and middle class agree on 1,594. That leaves only 185 bills on which the rich and the middle class disagree; on those 185 bills, the rich got their preferred outcome 53 percent of the time and the middle class got what they wanted 47 percent of the time. The difference between the two is not statistically significant.

They also looked at the views of the poor — those at the 10th percentile of the income scale. Here, too, there's lots of agreement. The poor, middle class, and rich agree on 80.2 percent of policies. However, policies supported by the poor and no one else passed a mere 18.6 percent of the time, suggesting that the rich and middle are effective at blocking policies that the poor want.